20 Health and Fitness Facts Based on Research that Could Help You

We are inundated each day with hundreds of adds while online, on our phones, watching TV, or from just about anything else we may read. With that said, there is a great deal of conflicting information and more than one view on just about any health/fitness/exercise topic. I’m always interested in where the content and data are coming from and are they backed by science. Even when it is, there can be times that the information or data collected has been taken from a small sample size or the researcher had a vested interest in the research being done.

Here are a few health and fitness facts for you that come from prominent academic sources involving research that you can hopefully use to improve your own health and fitness.

  • The University of Pennsylvania Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory looked at the sleeping and eating behavior of 225 people. They reported, in the journal Sleep, when you’re awake between the hours of 10 p.m. and 4 a.m., you’re more likely to consume extra calories. The group ate an average of 553 more calories, typically choosing foods higher in fat, when they were kept awake until the early morning hours.
  • Research published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology, show mind-body interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga and Tai Chi do more than just relax us; they can ‘reverse’ the molecular reactions in our DNA which cause ill-health and depression.
  • Research from the journal Obesity, shows exposure to higher levels of cortisol, an indicator of stress, over several months is associated with people being more heavily, and more persistently, overweight. The research involved 2,527 men and women aged 54 and older who participated in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, that looked at data over a four-year period.
  • Dr. Robert Lustig, author of Fat Chance, and his colleagues have shown through their research that every additional 150 calories of added sugar consumed above daily requirements was associated with a 1.1 percent increase risk of type 2 diabetes. A second study showed subjects who got 17-21% of their calories from added sugar had a 38% risk of dying from cardiovascular disease compared to those who consumed 8% of their calories from added sugar. The risk was more than double for those who consumed 21% or more of their calories from added sugar (D’Adamo, 2015).
  • “Fat (in our diet) is not the problem,” says Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. “If Americans could eliminate sugary beverages, potatoes, white bread, pasta, white rice and sugary snacks, we would wipe out almost all the problems we have with weight and diabetes and other metabolic diseases.” Research from Harvard University published in the New England Journal of Medicine followed subjects over a twenty year period and determined that the food most often associated with weight gain was you guessed it, white potatoes (NEJM, 2011).
  • The fact is that a brain hijacked by a diet high in sugar and flour blocks weight loss. It does this in three ways: (1) sugar and flour raise baseline insulin levels far past what our bodies were designed to handle. The elevated insulin not only sets us up for diabetes, but it turns out its blocking the brain from recognizing a critical hormone: leptin. (2) after eating the average American amount of sugar for just three weeks, 22 teaspoons, the brain’s pleasure receptors do something called “down-regulating.” Essentially, to cope with the excessive stimulation, the brain takes some of its receptors offline. (3) willpower isn’t a dimension of your personality, something some people are born with and others simply lack. Willpower is a cognitive function and we all have about the same amount, fifteen minutes, give or take. Meaning any successful diet MUST expect that your willpower will fail AT LEAST once a day and work anyway (source: Susan Pierce Thompson, PhD).
  • The average American consumes too much added sugar on a daily basis. Americans currently eat about 76 pounds of different forms of sugars every year. Even though we have seen a 15% decrease in added sugar consumption since 1999, according to government data, the typical person still eats about 94 grams (or 375 calories) on a daily basis (U.S. Department of Agriculture).
  • A meta-analysis published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise reviewed 49 studies of men ages 50 to 83 who did progressive resistance training and found that subjects averaged a 2.4-pound increase in lean body mass.
  • Approximately three decades of age-related strength loss and two decades of age-related muscle mass loss can be recovered or reversed within the first couple of months of starting a strength training program. (Ivey, 2000).
  • A study in the journal Nutrients suggests a daily intake of 1 to 1.3 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight for older adults who do regular strength training. This is much higher than 0.8 grams/kg/body weight than you may have previously read or been told. This would mean, for example, that a 175-pound man would need about 79 grams to 103 grams a day. If possible, divide your protein equally among your daily meals to maximize muscle protein synthesis.
  • It was reported in Stuart Phillips 2016 paper, Protein “requirements” beyond the RDA: implications for optimizing health, that “evidence suggests that intakes of high quality protein in the range of 1.2-1.6 grams/kilo/body weight is a more ideal target to achieve optimal health outcomes in adults.”
  • The average American spends more than 9 hours a day sitting. Research shows that people who sit the most have a 112 percent increase in the Relative Risk (RR) of Diabetes and a 147 percent increase in the RR of cardiovascular events compared to people who sit the least. Sitting down for a large part of the day has similar mortality rates to smoking (Wilmot et al., 2012).
  • According to research, individuals who did not strength train lost about 5 to 7 pounds of muscle every ten years and a by-product of this was that there was a reduction in their metabolism by about 50 calories a day. As you grow older, the loss of muscle becomes more pronounced and by the time you reach the age of 70, the muscular system has experienced a 40 percent loss of muscle mass and a 30 percent decrease in strength.
  • Strength appears to peak between the ages of 25 and 35 and is maintained or slightly lower between ages 40 and 59 and then declines by 12-14 percent per decade after 50 years of age, according to research published by Doherty in 2001.
  • Research has demonstrated that individuals who use a pedometer take an additional 2,000 steps each day compared to nonusers and their overall physical activity level increases by 27 percent. Looks like its time to break out the pedometer and start to step it up!
  • In a 2014 study in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Australian researchers looked at the relationship between various personality traits and exercise and other health-related habits. The researchers found that people who thought they had control over their lives were more likely to exercise and adopt other healthy steps than those who felt that luck or fate largely dictated their lives.
  • According to Len Kravitz, PhD, a researcher at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, “High intensity interval training (HIIT) adds up to 15 percent more calories to the total calories expended.” That means if you’ve worked off 550 calories doing HIIT, you can reasonably expect to burn at least another 83 calories post-exercise.
Credit: https://sunstonefit.com
  • Research has shown that drinking 17-ounces of water upon waking up in the morning will increase your metabolic rate by about 30 percent over the next few hours. The same researchers believe that over the course of a year, individuals who increase water consumption by just 1.5 liters a day could burn an extra 17,400 calories and experience a five-pound weight loss.
  • Research from the University of Massachusetts Medical School determined that those who skip breakfast are 4 ½ times more likely to be obese compared to people who make time to eat in the morning.
  • According to a Georgia Centenarian Study, individuals who eat breakfast regularly have lower rates of Type 2 diabetes and are less likely to develop heart failure over the course of their lifetime compared to than those who don’t eat breakfast. The study that looked at older Americans, over a 13-year period, suggests that regularly eating breakfast may lead to a longer-than-average life span.

References

Phillips SM et al., (2016). Protein “requirements” beyond the RDA: implications for optimizing health, Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metab. 41: 565-572

Sarah E. Jackson, Clemens Kirschbaum, Andrew Steptoe (2017), Hair cortisol and adiposity in a population-based sample of 2,527 men and women aged 54 to 87 years. Obesity, 25 (3):539 DOI: 10.1002/oby.21733

Ivana Buric, Miguel Farias, Jonathan Jong, Christopher Mee, Inti A. Brazil (2017). What Is the Molecular Signature of Mind–Body Interventions? A Systematic Review of Gene Expression Changes Induced by Meditation and Related Practices. Frontiers in Immunology, 8 DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2017.00670

Wilmot EG1, Edwardson CL (2012). Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: systematic review and meta-analysis, Diabetologia. 55(11): 2895-905. doi: 10.1007/s00125-012-2677-z

Poon, L.W., Clayton, G., & Martin, P., et al. (1989). Individual similarities and differences of the oldest-old in the Georgia Centenarian Study. The Gerontologist, 29, 43.

Boschmann M, Steiniger J, Hille U, Tank J, Adams F, Sharma AM, Klaus S, Luft FC, Jordan J. (2003). Water-induced thermogenesis. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 88(12):6015-6019

Ivey, FM et al., The Effects of Age, Gender and Myostatin Genotype on the Hypertrophic Response to Heavy Resistance Strength Training. J. Gerontol: Med Sci 55A: M641-M848, 2000.

Mozaffarian D, Hao T, Rimm EB, Willett WC, and Hu FB, (2011). Changes in Diet and Lifestyle and Long-Term Weight Gain in Women and Men. New England J Med; 364:2392-2404.

Thompson SP (2017). There Is A Reason You Can’t Lose Weight

D’Adamo P.J (2015). The Many Consequences of Sugar Imbalance

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What’s More Important: Diet or How Much You Exercise?

You have probably wondered at some point in your life, is diet more important than exercise or does exercise trump diet. I think the question that you first need to ask yourself is: “What is your main outcome or goal?” If your answer is strictly weight loss, both diet and exercise are important but the focus placed on diet is slightly higher. If you’re looking to just maintain a healthy lifestyle then you need to consistently monitor and focus on both. Remember, you can’t manage something if you don’t measure it. Finally, if you’re someone who has lost a significant amount of weight and your goal is to maintain that weight loss for the rest of your life then both diet and exercise are your best friends.

One of the best research-based organizations that looks at these types of questions and more is the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR). The NWCR is the brain-child of Rena Wing, PhD, from Brown University Medical School and James Hill, PhD, from the University of Colorado. The NWCR “provides information about the strategies used by successful weight loss maintainers to achieve and maintain long-term weight loss.” The NWCR is currently tracking over 10,000 individuals who have lost significant amounts of weight and, most importantly, have kept it off for long periods of time.

NWCR members have lost an average of 72.6 pounds and maintained the loss for more than 5 years. “To maintain their weight loss, members report engaging in high levels of physical activity (≈1 h/day/walking), eating a low-calorie, low-fat diet, eating breakfast regularly, self-monitoring weight, and maintaining a consistent eating pattern across weekdays and weekends.”

What should help clear up this debate is the fact that only 1 percent of the huge NWCR database (>10,000 subjects) have been successful at keeping their weight off with exercise alone. About 10 percent of the subjects have been successful with weight-loss maintenance by focusing on diet alone. More than 89 percent of the subjects have been successful because of BOTH diet and exercise modifications.

Your best bet is to spend quality time at the gym a few times a week and remember to challenge yourself when you’re moving through your paces. Stay active throughout the week and especially during the weekends. Focus on eating clean, healthy foods, avoiding highly processed foods while watching the added sugar in everything you eat. Finally, know that diet and exercise are your best choices to help get you there and once you’ve reached your goals, will help keep you there!

References

Wing RR, Hill JO. Successful weight loss maintenance. Annu Rev Nutr 2001;21:323–41.

Wing RR, Phelan S. Long-term weight loss maintenance. Am J Clin Nutr 2005; 82(1): 222S-225S.

What Affect Does Diet and BMI Have on Physical Fitness?

Introduction

Recent studies have shown that the physical fitness of an individual can be a promising indicator in measuring health and risk for outcomes such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and skeletal health. (1) The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends children and adolescents between the ages of 5-17 should get at least 60 minutes a day of moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity. Regular physical activity is associated with many health benefits in children and can improve cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, as well as bone health (4). It is noteworthy to promote regular physical activity because research shows that cardiorespiratory fitness levels are significantly associated with total body fat and abdominal adipose tissue. (1) Lower levels of cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness are associated with CVD risk factors. (1) And improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness have positive effects on things like depression, anxiety, self-esteem, and academic performance. (1)

Findings from a cross-sectional study done in South Carolina found that children who are obese generally spend less time in moderate and vigorous physical activity than non-obese children. (2) It also found that the energy density of a child or adolescent’s diet is directly associated with fat intake, and both energy dense high-fat diets are associated with obesity. (2) In past studies it has been suggested that reducing dietary ED by combining increased fruit and vegetable intake, as well as decreasing total fat intake, was seen to control hunger and be an effective strategy for weight loss. (3)

High-fat diets can easily turn into unhealthy diets that lead to high risk of CVD and insulin resistance, and high-fat diets generally have high energy densities. (5) According to the CDC, 1 in 6 children and adolescents is obese and obesity affects 12.7 million children and adolescents between the ages of 2-19 years old. There is a 75% predicted increase in obesity by 2018. Children who are overweight and obese are more likely to become overweight and obese as adults. (CDC) Studies have shown that for every hour of exercise a day, risk for obesity is decreased by 10%. (2) The measure of physical fitness in children and adolescents can display health as well as predict future health outcomes as an adult. (7)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate if diet and BMI of children affected physical fitness levels by using data from the NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey. Energy density and total fat in the diet, as well as the BMI of the participants, were the variables used to assess performance on three important physical fitness categories, measured by the outcomes of four different physical fitness tests. The objective was to determine if BMI, energy density, and fat intake was significantly associated with physical fitness levels, and what this could mean as an outcome.

Methods

Data Source & Inclusion Criteria

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a cross-sectional survey that assesses the health and nutritional status of children and adults in the US. This experiment used the NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey (NNYFS). The NNYS is a one-year, cross-sectional survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics in 2012. For the purpose of analysis, this was the main source of physical fitness data. It had the purpose of gathering nationally representative data that represented physical activity and fitness levels, as well as provided an evaluation of health and fitness of children and adolescents ages 3-15. Data was collected through fitness tests and interviews. The nutritional component of data in the NHANES comes from What We Eat In America (WWEIA), gathered through dietary recall from each of the participants.

This analysis included a study sample of all children and adolescents between the ages of 3-15, who participated in the 2012 NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey. However, many children between >6 years met the exclusion criteria and did not participate the physical fitness tests used in this study to evaluate fitness levels. This resulted in a final n of 1,224 participants between the ages of 6-15.

Outcome Measures

The outcome measures in this study included three categories of physical fitness. Physical fitness was evaluated through fitness tests as part of the NNYS. Participants 6-15 years old participated in fitness tests (summer 2012), which evaluated the health of each age group. The NNYFS contains examination data that evaluates body measures, cardiorespiratory endurance, cardiovascular fitness, lower body muscle strength, muscle strength, and gross motor development. For this analysis, physical fitness was measured using the following categories: cardiorespiratory endurance, core muscle strength, and upper body muscle strength.

Cardiorespiratory endurance was measured by examining fitness test results of heart rate at the end of the test (bpm) and maximal endurance time (in seconds). Core muscle strength was determined by the number of seconds plank position was held (in seconds). Upper body strength was evaluated by the number of correctly completed pull-ups the participant could do. Each exercise was assessed in regards to BMI, energy density, and total fat.

Demographic Characteristics and Potential Confounding Variables

In order to assess if physical fitness was affected, variables of BMI, energy density (kcal), and total fat (gm) were used. The NHANES gathered data of total nutrient intakes from dietary interviews given by well-trained professionals. The dietary intake data can be used to estimate the types and amounts of food (as well as beverages) consumed throughout the past 24-hours. In the NHANES, body mass index (BMI) was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared (rounded to one decimal place). In order to analyze BMI as a categorical variable (BMI Category), sex-specific BMI quartiles were created from body mass index data and cutoff criteria from the CDC’s sex-specific 2000 BMI-for-age growth charts. BMI category provided four quartiles: 1) Underweight, 2) Normal weight, 3) Overweight, and 4) Obese.

Energy density and total fat were variables used to measure diet of children and adolescents. Dietary intake for energy density and total fat was measured using 24-hour recalls. To account for confounding factors, which occur when the outcome is influenced by a third factor, data from the NHANES regarding age, gender, race and income were used as covariates and all models run were adjusted according to this. What was looked at was whether energy, total fat, and BMI were significantly (inversely) associated with a decrease in physical fitness of children and adolescents.

Statistical Measures Used

Data from the NHANES was analyzed using SAS University Edition (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). To examine if there was a significant association of physical fitness levels with BMI and energy density / total fat intake, the PROC REG procedure was used. PROC REG procedure was used to analyze significance, if any, in upper body muscle strength (pull-ups), core muscle strength (plank), and cardiorespiratory endurance (heart rate, maximal endurance time). These models were adjusted for age in years at exam, race, and gender, and significance was determined with a value of p<0.05. BMI Category was analyzed using the GLM procedure to predict an outcome based on a categorical variable. Graphical data shown below is the performance outcomes based on the data from results of the GLM procedure of BMI category and the specific physical fitness exercises.

Results

The data obtained from this study indicates that there was a significant inverse relationship observed between diet / BMI and various aspects of physical fitness of children and adolescents. There was a significant negative association of energy density in pull-ups (p=0.0458) and heart rate at the end of test (p=0.0195). Total fat intake had a significant inverse affect on heart rate (p=0.0404).

BMI was the most significant factor in affecting physical fitness. Children who are overweight/obese have less upper body strength than non-obese children. The mean number of pull-ups was approximately 5. Children who are obese completed on average almost 4 less pull-ups than children who are of normal weight (see figure 1).

Figure 1.

julia-paper
Source: Julia Wood

Children who are overweight/obese exhibit lower levels of cardiorespiratory endurance than normal weight children. Maximal endurance time was measured in seconds and measures the amount of time the actual exercise test takes (does not include warm up or recovery). The mean maximal endurance time was 650 seconds. Children who were overweight/obese were not able to perform the exercise test as long as those of normal weight. Overweight children lasted about 632 seconds, while obese children only lasted about 551 seconds, compared to normal weight children who could last approximately 632 seconds.

Children with a higher BMI have a lower level of cardiorespiratory endurance. The mean heart rate at the end of the test was 220 beats per minute (bpm). A non-obese child of normal weight had a heart rate of 249 bpm, while an overweight child had a heart rate of 208 bpm and an obese child had a heart rate of 209 bpm.

Children with a higher BMI display lower levels of core muscle strength. The plank is an exercise that assesses muscular endurance and core strength around the trunk and pelvis (NNYFS). Children with a normal weight had a greater ability to hold the plank position. Almost 35 seconds longer than obese children and almost 15 seconds longer than children who are overweight (see Figure 2).

Figure 2.

coremuscle
Source: Julia Wood

Strengths and Limitations

 In light of the results from this analysis, it is important to note the strengths as well as limitations. Strengths of using the NNYFS include the fact that it is a cross-sectional study that represents physical fitness levels and health of US children and adolescents as a whole. This means that the results can be applied to the entire population of US children and adolescents. Results show that there is a prevalence of low physical fitness levels in children and adolescents who have high BMI and an increased intake of high-fat/energy dense diets. From this analysis, the simple promotion of increased physical activity as well has healthy diets can be put out into the public in hopes of slowing the obesity epidemic and better health in children.

There are some weaknesses to this research. Diet factors of energy density and total fat were used in this study. Data was acquired for these two factors by dietary recall, so there is a possibility of recall bias. Also, the NHANES National Youth Fitness survey is of a cross-sectional survey design, so although analysis can point out prevalence stemming from results, it cannot determine causality. This study also uses two physical fitness tests that somewhat depend on weight/body mass. Pull-ups as well as plank exercises may be subject to influence based on body weight, which could skew results.

Conclusion

Our findings from this study indicate that a child or adolescent’s BMI and diet affect his or her performance on physical fitness tests. Children and adolescents who are overweight or obese (85th-95th percentile or >95th percentile) are seen to have lower levels of cardiorespiratory endurance, upper body muscular strength, and core muscle strength. High BMI was seen to negatively affect physical fitness the most and was more significant than any other factor (p<.001).

There is a significant inverse association between energy dense / high-fat diets and various aspects of cardiorespiratory endurance and upper body strength. Physical fitness is a marker of health and can predict health as an adult. Regular physical activity of at least 60 minutes a day for children and adolescents promotes health and fitness and may help to prevent obesity. Strategies promoting healthy eating may also slow the obesity epidemic.

References

  1. Ortega, F. B., Ruiz, J. R., Castillo, M. J., & Sjöström, M. (2008). Physical fitness in childhood and adolescence: a powerful marker of health. International journal of obesity, 32(1), 1-11.
  2. Ebbeling, C. B., Pawlak, D. B., & Ludwig, D. S. (2002). Childhood obesity: public-health crisis, common sense cure. The lancet, 360(9331), 473-482.
  3. Ello-Martin, J. A., Roe, L. S., Ledikwe, J. H., Beach, A. M., & Rolls, B. J. (2007). Dietary energy density in the treatment of obesity: a year-long trial comparing 2 weight-loss diets. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 85(6), 1465-1477.
  4. Janssen, I., & LeBlanc, A. G. (2010). Systematic review of the health benefits of physical activity and fitness in school-aged children and youth. International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 7(1), 1.
  5. Guldstrand, M. C., & Simberg, C. L. (2007). High-fat diets: healthy or unhealthy?. Clinical Science, 113(10), 397-399.
  6. Schrauwen, P., & Westerterp, K. R. (2000). The role of high-fat diets and physical activity in the regulation of body weight. British Journal of Nutrition, 84(04), 417-427.
  7. Harper, M. G. (2006). Childhood obesity: strategies for prevention. Family & community health, 29(4), 288-298.

Julia Wood is a senior at Fairfield University in Connecticut where she is preparing to graduate in May 2017 with a degree in Biology and minor in Health Studies. Julia was a 4-year member of the Fairfield women’s D1 cross-country team.

How Diet and Exercise Helps You Fight Disease

There are days where you may wonder – does all the time I spend on exercising and attention I give to my diet even matter? Will I receive health benefits even though the bathroom scale, at times, may not change and my expectations are rarely met?

There is plenty of evidence that shows diet and exercise does in fact have a positive association with various health outcomes. They can help fight off or retard many diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

healthy-living
Photo Credit: http://johnfawkes.com/

New research out of UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior has demonstrated that both diet (a Mediterranean diet) and physical fitness can determine whether or not you’ll be a victim of the disease. The study has shown that:

“healthy diet, regular physical activity, and a normal body mass index–also known as a BMI, or weight-to-height ratio–can actually reduce the incidence of protein build-ups correlated with onset of Alzheimer’s disease.”

There are around 5.2 million people in the United States that currently suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and an estimated $200 billion is spent on trying to cure this condition annually. The research from UCLA and other research groups proves, rather unsurprisingly, that “prevention and a healthy lifestyle are actually far more effective than reactive action to disease.”

As you get ready to enter another new year, take stock in the fact that the time and attention spent on your exercise and diet will, in the long run, will pay back strong dividends.

Countdown to the Marathon: A Runner’s Diet

Source: http://mashable.com
Source: http://mashable.com

COUNTDOWN TO THE MARATHON

Running a marathon, Like Boston or NYC which is coming up on November 1st, takes months of physical (and mental) preparation.

Hydration and nutrition are 2 critical pieces to ensure a successful and healthy race.

The week before…

  • In the week leading up to the race your diet shouldn’t change too much. As your training is likely decreasing you should continue to have a standard well-balanced diet with lean protein, fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats.

A few days before…

  • In the days leading up, hydration should be the main focus. In order to ensure adequate hydration on the day of you should be drinking plenty of fluids (64-80 oz., or more depending on your workouts) consistently every day in the week leading up.

The night before…

  • The night before a race is a critical time to maximize your glycogen stores, which is the energy stored in your muscles. You’re going to want to plan on eating a high carb meal the night prior to ensure proper glycogen build up. You also want to avoid high fat consumption the night before. Our bodies can burn fat to use as energy however it is a less efficient fuel source. Studies show a high fat diet can decrease overall performance and decrease time to fatigue – meaning you hit the wall sooner.  Keep the high carb meal healthy with fresh marinara sauce, pasta and bread and a couple lean turkey meatballs.

30 minutes before… 

  • Immediately before the race (about 30 minutes) plan to have a small meal with simple carbs (low fiber) and protein. The simple carbs will break down quickly acting as an immediate fuel source to give you that burst of energy before tapping into your glycogen stores. Eating a moderate amount of protein (15-20 grams) prior to the race has been shown to increase performance and speed up recovery – win, win! Some of my go to recommendations are PBJ on English muffin, banana and Greek yogurt, fruit and granola bar (<4 grams fiber), or protein shake (10-15 grams protein) blended with fruit.

After you’ve completed the marathon…

  • For the best recovery post-race, load up on protein as soon as possible. I always encourage clients to have a protein bar nearby to consume after crossing the finish line. Lean protein and hydration is going to be needed to rebuild your muscle fibers in the days to come! Stay hydrated with at least 64-80 oz. of fluids daily and incorporate lean protein at each meal after the race.

unnamed-1Amanda Foti, MS, RD, CDN

Senior Dietitian

Amanda is a Registered Dietitian and a New York State Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist with a Masters in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She has broad experience managing disease with nutrition and lifestyle in the clinical setting, and extensive training in cognitive behavioral therapy in relation to emotional eating and weigh management counseling. Amanda currently works one-on-one with clients developing personalized weight management plans that address nutrition, activity and lifestyle.