How One Small Change this Year Could Have a Significant Impact on Your Overall Health

If you’re looking to make one change this year that in turn will have the biggest impact on your overall health, then start looking at the amount of added sugar you’re consuming. All the exercise that you’re doing is great but simply cutting back on your daily added sugar consumption, in conjunction with moving more, is the key to effectively changing your body composition and improving your overall health.

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Source: http://www.heart.org

To help keep you motivated, take a waist and hip circumference measurement and look at what is known as the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). Check this every 8-12 weeks and monitor changes. Research has demonstrated that there is a direct correlation with added sugar consumption, overall health and WHR.

“The WHO defines the ratios of >9.0 in men and >8.5 in women as one of the decisive benchmarks for metabolic syndrome. Welborn and Dahlia (2007) and Srikanthan, Seeman, and Karlamangla (2009) confirm, and cite several other investigations that show waist-to-hip ratio being the superior clinical measurement for predicting all cause and cardiovascular disease mortality.”  (Kravitz)

Look to put yourself (and family) on a sugar budget at the start of the new year. Its difficult to totally remove it from your diet but if you begin to monitor it on a daily basis, you’ll be amazed first, how prevalent it is and secondly, as you slowly begin to take it away you won’t crave it as much after a week or two.

Start by reading all food labels and cut back on the processed foods. You need to first get educated on where sugar “hides” and then start to cut back. Keep in mind there are more than 50 different names for sugar, avoid anything that ends in “ose” or contains high-fructose corn syrup etc. Choose better food options for you and your family and begin to replace the high sugar foods today. This is from a recent tweet of mine:

A simple concept that I follow for myself and my (male) clients is to consume no more than 150 calories a day from added sugar which equates to 38 grams (which is what you can start to keep track of or “budget” on a daily basis). Keep in mind that carbohydrates contain 4 calories/gram of energy (4/150 = 38 grams). Women on that same line should consume no more than 100 calories a day from added sugar which figures out to 25 grams a day (4/100 = 25 grams).

There are two types of sugars, natural sugar and added sugar. The conversation today is not about natural sugars (like fruit, milk, cheese, etc.) it’s about added sugar, which is everything you may have been eating that comes out of a package, box, carton or can.

If you need a little more convincing on the topic, take time to read Gary Taubes latest book, The Case Against Sugar, which I highly recommend.

Follow this one health tip and you will not only see noticeable changes – you’ll also avoid having a negative impact on your metabolism, the way all fad diets invariably do.

References

Welborn, T.A. and Dhaliwal, S.S. (2007). Preferred clinical measures of central obesity for predicting mortality. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61, 1373-1379.

Srikanthan, P., Seeman, T.E., and Karlamangla, A.S. (2009). Waist-hip-ratio as a predictor of all-cause mortality in high-functioning older adults. Annals of Epidemiology, 19, 724-731.

Taubes, G., (2017) The Case Against Sugar, Random House.

Follow These 4 Rules if Weight Loss is Your Goal

Healthy-Weight-Loss-Tips
Credit: http://wiiskins.com

According to WHO statistics, more than 1.9 billion adults were overweight in 2014 and of these, more than 600 million were categorized as obese. The number of children, in 2013, under the age of 5 that were overweight or obese was 42 million. The good news, however, is obesity is preventable. In terms of a percentage, 38 percent were men and 40 percent were women. The worldwide prevalence of obesity has more than doubled over the past 34 years. But again, the good news is that obesity is preventable.

The goal for many is weight loss or changing their body composition, which means building more lean muscle tissue and reducing body fat. A long-term goal for men might be 80 percent lean muscle and 20 percent body fat, this would eventually shift towards 85 percent lean muscle and 15 percent body fat. For women, a long-term goal, with exercise and nutritional modification of course, might be 70 percent lean and 30 percent body fat. Eventually those numbers would shift towards 77 percent lean muscle and 23 percent body fat.

To reach your goals, you must regulate your exercise and diet. Here are a few steps to follow to help you reach your goals.

1. Remove the “empty” calories from you diet. This means do not drink your calories. The average American consumes between 400-550 calories a day from soda, sports drinks etc. You could lose a pound a week just by cutting back on this and yes, it means alcohol too. A study in the journal Obesity found that people who drink diet soda were more likely to have a higher percentage of body fat around their mid-section. Subjects who reported not drinking diet soda gained an average of 0.8 inches in their waist circumference over the 9-year period compared to 1.83 inches for occasional diet soda drinkers and more than 3 inches for people who drank diet soda every day, according to a new study recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. An easy way to decrease your calories and break your diet soda routine is to simply drink more water.  Your goal is to drink water first thing in the morning to help speed up your metabolism and then again with your meals. Try a glass of water with lemon in the evening after dinner.

2. Add strength training to your exercise routine. This is critical for both lean muscle development and maintenance. Muscle is more metabolically active than fat (it takes 3x more calories per pound to maintain) and requires a third less space on your body. Strength train 2-3x a week.

3. Decrease your added sugar. Are you aware of how much added sugar you’re eating on a daily basis? If you’re drinking 1-2 medium size Cokes or other soft drinks – you’re probably already over your limit….and we have not even looked at your meals/snacks yet. If you cut your added-sugar to less than 150 calories a day (38 grams) for men and 100 calories a day (25 grams) for women, you will experience weight loss.

4. Increase your NEAT, EPOC and TEF. Let’s first define these terms and keep in mind they are important. Non-exercise activity thermogenesis or NEAT according to researcher James Levine, MD, PhD, is “the energy expended for everything we do that is not sleeping, eating or sports-like exercise. It ranges from the energy expended walking to work, typing, performing yard work, undertaking agricultural tasks and fidgeting.”

Excess post oxygen consumption or EPOC (some call it “after-burn”) is defined by Len Kravitz, PhD, as the period of time when the “body is restoring itself to its pre-exercise state, and thus is consuming oxygen at an elevated rate. This means that energy is also being expended at an elevated rate.” This occurs at a higher rate as the intensity of exercise increases and is seen following both a cardio and strength session. A very challenging strength session or high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is ideal for elevated EPOC which means your body continues to burn calories long after the bout of exercise is completed.

The thermic effect of food or TEF is defined by Reed and Hill as an “increase in metabolic rate after ingestion of a meal.” One of the many benefits of eating more good sources of lean protein as part of your diet is because protein has a higher thermic effect compared to carbohydrate and fat. Eating smaller meals more often – compared to a few big meals throughout the day – may also make better sense to you now. Your body utilizes 10 percent of its daily energy, in the form of calories, towards TEF.  For example, if you consume 2,500 calories over the course of the day, about 10 percent, or about 250 calories, will be expended on digesting, absorbing, metabolizing and eliminating that food.

Hopefully these tips will help you reach your goals and if not you can always remember that individuals who let “creeping obesity” set in, eventually, have other issues to worry about such as:

  • High Blood Pressure
  • Diabetes
  • High Cholesterol
  • Heart Disease
  • Various forms of Cancer
  • Ulcers
  • Gallstones
  • Skin Infections
  • Back Pain
  • Increased Stress levels
  • Poor Quality of Life